Tokyo, Japan

Welcome to OAC Tokyo! Resilience, Community and Design is where it all starts

Following the earthquake and tsunmai that hit northern Japan in march 2011 we teamed up with friends Holding Hands and Beyond Exposure to raise funds for a community center to be built with students and staff of Keio Univerity in Minami Sanriku

  • 2011

    completed

Community Center was built with support form the Environmental Innovators Program/Keio University, to benefit the residents of the heisei no mori temporary housing area in minami sanriku. In the summer of 2011 peak use was about 3000 persons / month. The resulting project won the Contract Inspirations Award! This is a community centre built to serve the Heisei no mori temporary housing area in Minami Sanriku. Hiroto Kobayashi of Keio University took on the project after being invited to build a bath for the community in the first months of 2012. As work progressed the bath was in the end found to be unnecessary, but the community centre was completed in the summer of 2012, and includes a large tatami covered meeting area with a small bath to one side. One of the challenges facing reconstruction efforts in the areas is a marked lack of carpenters and of sophisticated materials and equipment. To overcome that challenge the structure of both phases of the project is formed from plywood panels that can be cut on site and assembled without special skills and using only basic tools and hardware, including hammers, nails, and saws. The entire project can be prepared and assembled by un-skilled volunteer labor and by the residents themselves. The project was finished with financial support of the Environmental Innovators Program at Keio University and from the Tokyo Chapter, in partnership with Friends Holding Hands (FHH) and Beyond Exposure.

  • 2012

    completed

The Tohoku Planning Forum was created by Christian Dimmer, Jan Eric Lindenberg, Agim Reci, Ryo Uematsu and Kit Weddle to bring people together to talk about ways to manage reconstruction in Tohoku. It has grown since then and now exists as a platform to discuss resiliency and community longevity in a time of profound change.

  • 2011

    ongoing project

If you want to get a feel for what kinds of projects were going on in the years after the Tohoku disaster check out this page, its a brilliant resource put together by the good people at Tohoku Planning Forum. It is theoretically an ongoing project but we need people to keep up the work so its not updated since 2014. This is both good and bad. Its good because it really acts as a snapshot of a time, but if we are completely honest it would be great to be able to update and expad the map. Peole with technical tools and/or people who want to fill in the gaps while traveling around Tohoku please contact us and lets see if we can work together on making the map even better!